Difference between revisions of "TCEC Season 16 Division P Game 113 – Leela-ScorpioNN"

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'''14... Be4 15. Qe3 Rb8 16. Nc3 Bb7 17. Qf4 Nh5 18. Qd2 Nhf6 19. Qf4 Nh5 20. Qe3 Nhf6 21. a3 a6 22. Qf4 Nh5 23. Qd2 Nhf6 24. d5 e5 25. e4'''
 
'''14... Be4 15. Qe3 Rb8 16. Nc3 Bb7 17. Qf4 Nh5 18. Qd2 Nhf6 19. Qf4 Nh5 20. Qe3 Nhf6 21. a3 a6 22. Qf4 Nh5 23. Qd2 Nhf6 24. d5 e5 25. e4'''
  
Now the question of the center is finally settled, and the play focus shifts to the queenside.
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Now the question of the center is finally settled, and the focus of the play shifts to the queenside.
  
 
'''25... a5 26. b4 Ra8 27. Rdc1 g6 28. Rab1 Ba6 29. Qe2 Kg7 30. Nd2 Bc8 31. Qe3 Ng4 32. Qd3 Ngf6 33. Qc2 Rh8 34. h3 h5 35. h4 Rg8 36. Nb5 Ba6 37. Bh3'''
 
'''25... a5 26. b4 Ra8 27. Rdc1 g6 28. Rab1 Ba6 29. Qe2 Kg7 30. Nd2 Bc8 31. Qe3 Ng4 32. Qd3 Ngf6 33. Qc2 Rh8 34. h3 h5 35. h4 Rg8 36. Nb5 Ba6 37. Bh3'''

Revision as of 13:23, 22 September 2019

Archive link: https://www.tcec-chess.com/archive.html?season=16&div=p&game=113

Game overview

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Position after 9... Nbd7


1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 4. g3 Bb7 5. Bg2 Bb4+ 6. Bd2 Bxd2+ 7. Qxd2 O-O 8. O-O d6

End of the book moves

9. Rd1 Nbd7 (diagram)

Now an amusing sequence of moves is commenced. The shuffling may seem arbitrary, but computer analysis with Lc0 shows that it is really about white attempting to play e4 early and black attempting to prevent it. ElzChess's gameplay analysis confirms this. For instance, if black did not actively play to prevent e4, Leela would seek to play 11. Nc3 and then 12. e4.


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Position after 50. axb4


10. Qc2 Be4 11. Qa4 Bb7 12. Qc2 Be4 13. Qd2 Bb7 14. Qd3

Novelty in the Lichess masters database.[1]

14... Be4 15. Qe3 Rb8 16. Nc3 Bb7 17. Qf4 Nh5 18. Qd2 Nhf6 19. Qf4 Nh5 20. Qe3 Nhf6 21. a3 a6 22. Qf4 Nh5 23. Qd2 Nhf6 24. d5 e5 25. e4

Now the question of the center is finally settled, and the focus of the play shifts to the queenside.

25... a5 26. b4 Ra8 27. Rdc1 g6 28. Rab1 Ba6 29. Qe2 Kg7 30. Nd2 Bc8 31. Qe3 Ng4 32. Qd3 Ngf6 33. Qc2 Rh8 34. h3 h5 35. h4 Rg8 36. Nb5 Ba6 37. Bh3

White gives voluntarily black a chance to double the b-pawns, but black refuses. Another round of shuffling moves begins.

37... Rf8 38. Rb2 Re8 39. Rbb1 Rf8 40. Qc3 Bc8 41. Rc2 Kg8 42. Qe3 Ba6 43. Qc3 Bc8 44. Qe3 Ba6 45. Nc3 Bc8 46. Qe2 Kg7 47. Nb5 Ba6 48. Kg2 Bxb5

One may ask why did black take the knight on b5 now. Based on the computer evaluations during the game, there indeed seems to be a small disagreement on this move, Leela expecting the more passive 48... Re8. Further computer analysis suggests that if black stays passive, white would eventually play bxa5 and enjoy the somewhat more advanced queenside pawns. Therefore, it seems that the disagreement between the players is about the resulting pawn structure. Arguably, Leela preferred the isolated double b-pawns here for white as happens in the game, but ScorpioNN would prefer the more traditional pawn structure.

49. cxb5 axb4 50. axb4 (diagram)

An interesting development in the queenside pawn structure. White now has the double isolated b-pawns and is locking black's queenside pawns with a Maroczy bind style structure (b5/d5 pawns). The doubled b-pawns for white may look odd, but the pawns controls important squares and cannot be attacked easily. Particularly, c5 would have been a useful square for a black knight, but the b4 pawn denies it. White now begins pressuring black's position using the open a-file by the rook and the protected c6 square by the queen.


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Position after 83. Kxf3


50... Ne8 51. Rbb2 Ndf6 52. Ra2 Rxa2 53. Rxa2 Nh7 54. Ra7 Qb8 55. Ra3 Qd8 56. Ra7 Qb8 57. Ra2 Qd8 58. Nc4 Nhf6 59. Qc2 Ng8 60. Nd2 Ngf6 61. Qc6 Rg8 62. Ra8 Qe7 63. Ra7 Qd8 64. Qb7 Kh8 65. Kf1 Ng4 66. Nf3 f6 67. Kg1 Rf8 68. Ra8 Qd7 69. Qc6 Qe7 70. Rc8 Kg8 71. Qa8 Ng7 72. Qb8 Rxc8 73. Qxc8+ Kh7 74. Nd2 Ne8 75. Nc4 f5 76. exf5 Nef6 77. fxg6+ Kxg6 78. f3 Nh6 79. Ne3 e4 80. Qe6

A queen-trade offer black cannot refuse. For example: 80... Qg7 81. g4 hxg4 82. fxg4 would simply lose a piece.

80... Qxe6 81. dxe6 exf3 82. Kf2 Nhg4+ 83. Kxf3 (diagram)

After the simplifications, white has now an objectively winning position. Black cannot stop white from making decisive progress.

83... Nxe3 84. Kxe3 Nd5+ 85. Ke4 Nf6+ 86. Kd4 Ng8 87. Bg2 Ne7 88. Bf3 Nf5+ 89. Ke4 Kf6 90. e7

White is now trading the passed e-pawn for connected g/h passers. Ultimately, the connected passers now are able to overstretch the mobility of black king and knight, and white will be able to win black's queenside pawns and the game.

90... Nxe7 91. Bxh5 Nf5 92. Kf4 Nd4 93. Be8 Ne2+ 94. Kf3 Nd4+ 95. Ke4 Nf5 96. Kf4 d5 97. Bc6 d4 98. Be4 Ng7 99. Bd3 Nh5+ 100. Kg4 Ng7 101. Kf3 Ke5 102. Bg6 Kf6 103. Bc2 Ke6 104. g4 Ke5 105. h5 Ne6 106. h6 Ng5+ 107. Kg3 Nf7 108. h7 Kf6 109. Kf4 Kg7 110. Bd3 Kh8 111. g5 Nd8 112. g6 Ne6+ 113. Ke5 Ng7 114. Kxd4 Ne8 115. Kd5 Ng7 116. Kc6 Ne8 117. Kd7 Nf6+ 118. Kxc7 Nd5+ 119. Kc6 Nf6 120. g7+ Kxg7 121. h8=Q+ Kxh8 122. Bc4 Ne4 123.Kxb6 1-0

The game was adjudicated as white win based on the Syzygy 6-men endgame tablebase.

Analysis

Game analysis by ElzChess


References